What’s your favorite movie?

If I were to ask you to name your favorite movie, would that be easy for you to do?  I feel like for the general populace, the answer is either easy, or “I don’t know.”  But for a film buff the answer becomes a lot more difficult.  At least, it does for me.  I tend to change my answer depending on a number of factors, including the identity of the questioner, the way the question was phrased, and who the audience is.  Here are some of my favorites, and why I will sometimes give them as my “favorite movie.”

If I’m in a situation where I’m being completely honest, my answer is usually that Hook is my favorite film.  It’s my de facto favorite movie, as it were.  It’s the movie that means the most to me, and that I connect with in a way that surpasses all others.  I think it’s a brilliant and remarkable movie, with some of the best sets ever created for the screen.  I could (and probably will) write an essay about Hook’s brilliance, but I’ll save that for another time.  I feel like Hook has been unfairly maligned through the years (it has a 29% on Rotten Tomatoes), though it does have a cult following.  Even Spielberg has said critical things of it.  I’m pretty defensive when it comes to Hook, because it does mean so much to me, so I often will name something else if I feel like there’s going to be an argument about it.  On the other hand, I like defying expectations, and for a film buff to pick a critical flop from the 90’s as his favorite film often surprises people.  I give this answer a lot when people who know that I’m a film buff ask me the question.  But it is, in fact, my favorite film, even if it’s not always my answer. Continue reading

Analysis: Jurassic Park, Our Generation’s Star Wars

Before our recent IMAX 3D viewing of Oz the Great and Powerful we were treated to a preview for the 3D re-release of Jurassic Park on April 5th (coincidentally, exactly 50 years before First Contact between humans and Vulcans, according to Star Trek).  This preview was in the form of a 3 or 4 minute clip, slightly edited to make it “suitable for all audiences”, from the T. rex attack on the tour vehicles.  Despite the volume being at levels that could do permanent hearing damage, my biggest recurring complaint about our local IMAX screen, and my general negative feelings about 2D-3D converted films, as opposed to movies filmed with 3D cameras, the scene was still absolutely captivating.  And while I wish they would just re-release Jurassic Park in 2D IMAX like they did with Raiders of the Lost Ark, and even considering that I saw Jurassic Park on the big screen at our local 1920s Fox Theatre, I’m still now officially excited for April 5th.

I still have vivid memories of first seeing Jurassic Park, almost 20 years ago. Continue reading